How would an oversight remove a fellow-overseer from that responsibility?

How would an oversight remove a fellow-overseer from that responsibility?

Human nature being what it is may at times make it seem impossible for overseers to work together. Divine grace being what it is will provide a way to work together in a godly fashion. And where a problem is developing, the sooner it is kindly confronted, the better.

Paul speaks about elders in the last paragraph (vv 17-25) of 1 Timothy chapter five. To be consistent with the flow of the paragraph, we note three initial statements he makes about elders: they should receive becoming respect (vv 17-18); they should be protected from unfounded criticism (v 19); they are particularly accountable to the assembly for public wrongs (v20). This latter teaching relates to the rest of the paragraph. Notably omitted, however, is any reference to his being removed from being an overseer.

If he is factious, he is to be confronted, but within the bounds of the oversight (Titus 3:10). If he refuses such admonitions, he and his teaching are to be rejected. How he could continue to serve as an overseer is difficult to imagine. However, an overseer whose sins fall within the scope of 1 Corinthians 5 is obviously removed from the oversight and the assembly. He is no longer "blameless" (1Ti 3:2), so could not return to that responsibility, even though he will hopefully be restored to the Lord and to the assembly.

D. Oliver